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Graduate Courses: Spring 2014

ENGL 50233 :: Studies in Creative Writing—Graduate Fiction Workshop
Matt Pitt
W 4:00 - 6:40

We will examine, in this workshop seminar—cross-listed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students—numerous modes within the fiction genre, including flash and collage forms, linked collections, novellas and collaborative projects, considering varied approaches to craft, to overall effect, to audience, and how each form insists upon a specific, artistic architecture within the house of narrative. Students will produce original fiction drawing from several modes. We will also concentrate on heavy revision, submitting multiple iterations of one fiction project over the course of the term. To aid students in their own progress and process, we will compare final and early drafts of contemporary masterworks, discussing the choices made and the avenues abandoned. When appropriate, we will also pore over ancillary materials, such as the authors’ companion journals or diary entries. We will explore the mystery of artistic impulse, and also honor the relentless self-interrogation of fiction writers who, line by line, steered and wrestled tentative sketches into polished and lasting works. Our overall goal, though, will be to reach beyond discussing those examples, and learn to draw from them, so that we might participate in the ongoing creative conversation.

 

Source texts may include:

  • The Half-Known World, Robert Boswell
  • Almost No Memory, Lydia Davis
  • The March, E.L. Doctorow
  • The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Trimalchio: An Early Version of The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Normal People Don’t Live Like This, Dylan Landis
  • Flannery O'Connor: The Growing Craft, A Synoptic Variorum, Karl-Heinz Westarp, ed.
  • Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids, Kenzaburo Oe
  • Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf
  • Mrs. Dalloway’s Party, Virginia Woolf
  • A Writer’s Diary, Virginia Woolf

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual/scholarly Production

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre; Textual/scholarly Production

Professional Outcomes: Students should understand how to write for publication

ENGL 60123 :: Modern Critical Theory
Dan Gil
T 4:00 - 6:40

This course will be a historical overview of some of the major schools and movements in critical theory in the 20th century. We will trace points of disagreement and convergence in 20th century critical theory. We will also examine the role of institutions (such as particular universities and think tanks) and professional organs (such as journals and conferences) in developing and channeling critical theory in the twentieth century. Major topics we will study include: the use of language as a model for culture; the role and limits of the concept of “discourse”; the rise of gender and sexuality as interpretive categories; the sociology of culture; and the turn to religion and “political theology.” Readings will include some key texts by Freud, Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Derrida, Foucault, Butler, Goldberg, Sedgwick, Bourdieu and Agamben.


English Studies Degree Outcomes: Theory
Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Theory

Professional Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently

 

Required course for Incoming graduate class

ENGL 60803 :: Literature Pedagogy
Bonnie Blackwell
M 2:00 - 3:40
; Lab section MWF 11:00 - 11:50 (Intro to Poetry)

The best teachers are lifelong learners.  With that in mind, this course prepares students for the career-long process of adapting to ever-changing student populations and new technology challenges.   Students will conceptualize and create independent courses in literary genre and field of specialization, including survey courses and introduction to genre courses.  It also requires that students become familiar with professional organizations and journals related to pedagogy and their future teaching field. We will explore the challenges and benefits of teaching with technology, including the Pearson eLearning studio, computer classrooms, smart phones and eReaders.  We will examine “best practices” of our colleagues and mentors in crafting clear, fair and workable course policies, grading rubrics, and assignment prompts to maximize student learning.

 

Because you will practice teaching on occasion and observing others, a lab section of Introduction to Poetry (ENGL 10113), with a projected focus on Literature and/as learning, will be attached to the graduate course.  You will not be attending or practice teaching in the Introduction to Poetry course every day, but you should ensure that you have no conflicts with the lab course so that you are available to participate in it as appropriate.

 

Requirements include:  short weekly reading responses; and oral presentation and written report on a pedagogy journal; two syllabi, one specialist and one lower-division, and teaching portfolio including an observation letter, a statement of teaching philosophy.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Not applicable since this is a required course.

Professional Outcomes:  familiarity with appropriate journals, prof. organizations; conferences and other outlets for scholarly work; develop courses in their field of specialization.

 

Required course for English PhD degree

ENGL 80433 :: Seminar in British Literature of the Romantic Period—Knowing Me, Knowing You: Romantic Knowledges
Anne Frey
R 2:00 - 4:40

What do we really know? How do we know or sympathize with others, whether our neighbors or people across the globe? Does our knowledge derive from our senses, from experience, from observation, from imagination? How do social standards influence our knowledge? And if we have trouble knowing others, can we know ourselves any better? The Romantic era saw the growth of scientific experimentation; the continued expansion of British imperial trade; the union of England and Ireland; and a Revolution and war that demanded British citizens reconsider the foundations of their social order. Against the backdrop of such changes, this course will examine what Romantic writers thought they knew, and thought they didn’t know, and how they attempted to learn. We will also consider how genres including sentimental and lyric poetry, the essay, the national tale, and the giftbook encode different strategies for and expose different problems with knowing ourselves and others. Reading may include Hume, Sterne, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Austen, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Charlotte Smith, Byron, Lamb, Owenson, Hemans, and Landon; we will conclude by examining the foundations of knowledge in Victorian realist or sensation fiction.

 

Rhetoric students are welcome, and could choose to pursue final projects on topics such as the role of writing and reading technology in the nineteenth century, or on nineteenth-century theories of education and learning. Although this class does not have official women's studies designation, I would also be happy to help interested students conduct a gender-focused final project and to apply for women's studies credit.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Textual/scholarly Production

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual/scholarly Production

Professional Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to write for publication.

ENGL 80523 :: Race and Gender in American Literature
Theresa Gaul
W 1:00 - 3:40

In this course, we will investigate the intersections of race and gender in the writings of the late eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century. During this period, biological theories of racial and gender difference gained ascendancy, and U.S. citizens debated questions related to slavery, women’s rights, the status of American Indians, and the emergence of U.S. imperialism. To engage students with the rich and flourishing field of scholarship in race and gender studies, we will explore recent work in the fields of Critical Race, Native, African American, Latina/o, Asian American, Whiteness, Queer, and Feminist Studies. In addition, we will examine literary texts central to the development of racial and gendered thought in the nineteenth century by authors of varying social locations and identities. Examples of authors that may be included are: Leonora Sansay, James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Brown (Cherokee), Black Hawk (Sauk), William Apess (Pequot), Elias Boudinot (Cherokee), Lydia Maria Child, Harriet Wilson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Textual/scholarly Production

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual/scholarly Production

Professional Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to write for publication.

ENGL 80613 :: Women's Rhetorics
Charlotte Hogg
T 1:00 - 3:40

In this course we will examine histories, theories, and methodologies in the field of women’s rhetorics. We will focus on such questions and issues as: 1) What is women’s rhetoric? What are the multiple forms of women’s rhetorical theories and practices? 2) How does scholarship in women’s rhetoric recover, examine, and theorize women’s rhetorical practices? 3) In what historical, cultural, and political contexts has women’s writing emerged or been suppressed? How have women found constructive ways to use traditional rhetoric despite having been excluded from that tradition historically? In what ways have they created new forms, theories, and practices? 4) How have feminist scholars in the field altered the ways research is defined and undertaken? Course assignments involve short responses, a community project, a professionalization project, collaborative book review, and a final project. In addition to examining histories, theories, methodologies, and enactments of women’s rhetorics, we’ll consider through a gendered lens how we compose and speak, how we use writing and rhetoric to take action in the world, and the implications for teaching and studying the rhetoric of women writers. Tentative reading list includes Joy Ritchie and Kate Ronald, Jacqueline Jones Royster and Gesa Kirsch, Cheryl Glenn, Nancy Mairs, Lindal Buchanan and Kathleen J. Ryan, Jessica Enoch, and more.

 

By the end of ENGL 80613, students should:

  • Articulate working definitions of women’s rhetoric as a term and as a field
  • Describe how women’s rhetorical practices and theories are historically and culturally situated
  • Describe and practice methodologies used in the field of women’s rhetoric
  • Compose in academic literacies and, when applicable, alternative forms modeled and encouraged by women’s rhetorical practices
  • Demonstrate through reading responses, class discussions, reviews, and a final project rhetorical analyses and critical engagement of intellectually challenging texts.

This course meets the following Grad Course Outcomes: R/C Rhetoric and Culture: Investigation into the scholarship directly associated with the field of rhetoric, especially as it impacts culture and society. Specifically, this area focuses on key texts on rhetoric and/or rhetorical analysis as a method of inquiry. ES Theory: Connect schools of theory to their historical and cultural contexts; Utilize theoretical tools to interpret texts

 

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Rhetoric and Culture

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Theory

Professional Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; students will become familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences and other outlets for scholarly work.

ENGL 80703 :: Seminar in Rhetoric: Digital Rhetorics
Jason Helms
R 5:30 - 8:10

This seminar will focus on digital rhetoric as theory and practice. We will read and discuss key figures and texts concerned with the theory of technology from the analytic and continental philosophical traditions and within other areas of media studies, particularly rhetoric and composition. We will also “read” digital texts – scholarly arguments written for academic conversations using a variety of modes. These will offer us a springboard for our own digital compositions. We will create digital academic arguments in using HTML 5 composing tools, positioning our arguments in relation to ongoing scholarly conversations.

 

In the course's final assignment, we will create an academic conversation that addresses a current scholarly conversation. We will create shorter assignments throughout the course to engage the conversations we are reading and learn how to use the technology.

 

Below is a list of tentative texts, but the actual list will likely change a good deal before the course begins.

  • Plato. Phaedrus. (available for free)
  • Ong, Walter J. Orality and Literacy. London: Routledge, 1982. Print.
  • Leroi-Gourhan, Andre. selections from Gesture and Speech. (pdf)
  • McLuhan, Marshall and Quentin Fiore. The Medium is the Message. Corte Madera, CA: Ginko Press, 2001. Print.
  • Debord, Guy. Society of the Spectacle. London: Black and Red, 2000. Print. (and available for free online).
  • Derrida, Jacques. “Plato’s Pharmacy.” From Dissemination. (pdf)
  • Deleuze, Gill. “Postscript on Control Societies.” (pdf)
  • Ronell, Avital. The Telephone Book. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska, 1989. Print.
  • Jenkins, Henry. Convergence Culture. New York: NYU Press, 2006. Print.
  • Gauntlett, David. Making Is Connecting. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2011. Print.
  • Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. Planned Obsolescence: Publishing Technology, and the Future of the Academy. New York: NYU Press, 2011. Print.
  • Gold, Matthew (ed.). Debates in the Digital Humanities. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012 and 2013. Web. (Available for free on line).
  • Galloway, Alexander. The Interface Effect. London: Polity, 2012. Print.
  • Banks, Adam. Digital Griots. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2011.
  • Ulmer, Greg. Avatar Emergency. Anderson, SC: Parlor Press, 2012. Print.
  • Heidegger, Martin. “The Question Concerning Technology” and selections from Being and Time. (pdf)
  • Rickert, Thomas. Ambient Rhetoric. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013. Print.
  • Stiegler, Bernard. What Makes Life Worth Living: On Pharmacology. London: Polity Press, 2013. Print.
  • Jockers, Matthew. Macroanalysis: Digital Methods and Literary History. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2013. Print and web.
  • Anderson, Dan. Screen Rhetoric and the Material World. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2013. Web. (Forthcoming, available for free online)
  • Various pdfs and electronic journal readings from DHQ, Kairos, Enculturation, and Itinerations.

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Rhetoric and Culture; Digital Humanities & Multimedia.

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Theory; Textual/Scholarly Production

Professional Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will enhance their competency in using technology.

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Graduate Courses: Fall 2013

 

ENGL 60113.055 :: Intro to Graduate Studies & the Profession of English
Dr. Neil Easterbrook
T 2:00 - 4:40

This is a required course for all incoming graduate students and must be taken in the Fall of their entering year.


English Studies is a broad term encompassing the diverse work done in contemporary English Departments, which often include literary studies, rhetoric and composition studies, creative writing, linguistics, and many other areas of our discipline. This seminar is an introduction to English Studies as a profession. The central goal of this course is to introduce you to the larger context of the profession so that you can use your graduate education to prepare to make a contribution within the many and varied discussions and debates ongoing in the disciplines associated with English. Over the semester, we will explore the history of the discipline in order to understand development and change in methods and theories in relation to the various institutional and intellectual contexts from which they emerged. This exploration will allow us to see the entwined paths of various kinds of work within contemporary English Departments. We will also look close to home at the TCU English Department, to see how the graduate faculty and their research projects represent fields and subfields, and how your research interests might fit into and mature within this department. Finally, we will consider the specific skills and strategies for study and research that will support your scholarly development.

 

Texts:

  • Professing Literature, Gerald Graff, ISBN: 0226305597
  • The University in Ruins, Bill Readings, ISBN: 0674929535
  • Introduction to Scholarship in Modern Languages and Literature, Ed. David G. Nicholls, 3/e, ISBN: 9780873525985
  • The Academic's Handbook, Eds. A. Leigh Deneef and Craufurd D. Goodwin, 3/e, ISBN: 0822338742
  • MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing, Joseph Gibaldi, 3/e, ISBN: 9780873522977
  • and a large number of journal essays and articles, accessible either online or as PDF files.

Writing assignments:

  • The semester's final assignment will be a comprehensive annotated bibliography of the assigned readings. The typical length of such a bibliography will be 35-40 double-spaced, typed pages. We ask that you submit your weekly annotations (@ 2-3 pages per week) every other week, then collect and revise the annotations for a final submission.
  • Brief exercises, such as CVs, conference proposal abstracts, or reports on TCU dissertations—many of which may be included in the comprehensive bibliography.
  • A multimedia project/presentation, to be defined by department faculty (something brief, represented by a typical week’s work). The presentation itself will be 10 minutes, although the project might be longer (explained in class).
  • A book review of 5-8 pages and a corresponding 10 minute class presentation, on a book about the current status of higher education. The review will be distributed to the seminar before class, and following the presentation there will be enlightening discussion.
  • All of the work for the term will be submitted in a final portfolio, by Thursday noon of exam week.

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual-Scholarly Production

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Textual-Scholarly Production

Program Outcomes: Students should be familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work; students should understand how to write for publication.

ENGL 60513.030 :: Teaching College Composition
Dr. Charlotte Hogg
MWF 11:00 - 11:50

(This is a required course for all Incoming Graduate Instructors and must be taken the first semester of teaching.)

 

Teaching College Composition (TCC), a graded 3-hour graduate course required for every new GI, is meant to provide pedagogical support—both theoretical and practical—throughout the first semester teaching writing at TCU. TCC continues the work begun in the pre-semester GI training you received and seeks to provide—and help you develop—resources, theories, concepts, and tools with which to teach 10803 and beyond. Our focus includes the immediate context surrounding your first teaching experience at TCU and your professional and theoretical development as a teacher more broadly. This class provides a space for discussion of classroom issues and ideas, but we will also concentrate on putting your classroom experiences into broader theoretical and pedagogical discussions by engaging with current composition theory. The course objectives, then, are to: 1) support your development as a teacher; 2) engage with composition theory and teaching composition at TCU to gain an understanding of the cohesiveness of the whole writing program; and 3) theorize and reflect on your teaching practices. Likely texts include The St. Martin's Guide for Teaching Writing, Personally Speaking: Experience as Evidence in Academic Discourse, Writing New Media, and online supplemental articles from CCC, College English, and more.

 

Program Outcomes: Students should be familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work; Students should demonstrate competency using technology.

ENGL 60723.080 :: Research Practices in Composition and Rhetoric
Dr. Brad Lucas
M 6:00 - 8:40

(This is a required course for all Rhetoric and Composition doctoral students.)

 

In this seminar, we will cover methods and theories of research practiced in Rhetoric and Composition, situated alongside literary analysis in particular and epistemology across the disciplines in general. Given the field’s explorations and debates over methodology, the seminar is designed for all graduate students in English, especially those who are interested in interdisciplinary work or want to enrich their understanding of knowledge production in academia. We will focus primarily on 20th century developments in research, with attention to epistemological issues, institutional influences, textual analysis, archival resources, scholarly writing genres, research ethics, and methods ranging from quantitative-experimental studies to qualitative-ethnographic approaches. Readings will be extensive, including (but not limited to) Janice M. Lauer and J. William Asher, Composition Research: Empirical Designs (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988); Mary Sue MacNealy, Strategies for Empirical Research in Writing (Longman, 1998); Stephen M. North, The Making of Knowledge in Composition: Portrait of an Emerging Field (Upper Monclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1987); and selected journal articles and book chapters. Seminar participants will write weekly reading responses, a literature review of 10-15 sources appropriate to a prospectus or grant proposal, and short analytic essays of particular studies; in addition, participants will work collectively with primary research data and conduct an interview with a scholar active in her or his field.

 

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual-Scholarly Production English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods and Methodology; Textual-Scholarly Production Program Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently; students should understand how to write for publication

ENGL 70583.074/80453.074 :: American Literature in Global Context/Seminar in British Literature: Transatlanticism
Dr. Linda Hughes & Dr. Sarah Robbins
W 4:00 - 6:40

(This is a cross-listed course meeting at the same time. Students should choose to register for the American Lit Section (under Robbins) or the Brit Lit Section (under Hughes) to get credit only once for the course.)

 

This seminar will examine the interactive relationship between literary texts, authorial careers, reading/writing practices, and literary production in the United States and Great Britain during the nineteenth century. Emphasizing the ongoing exchange of print culture that spanned this period, students’ reading and research across primary and secondary texts will situate American and British literatures, broadly conceived to include such geographical frames as Canadian and Caribbean, in a vibrant international rhetorical context. Genres explored will include poetry, fiction, life and travel writing, children’s literature, periodical essays, and correspondence, as well as texts from visual and oral culture. Authors represented could include Rowson, Prince (as edited by Strickland/Moodie), Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stowe, Martineau, Eliot, Gaskell, Moodie, Anna Jameson, Longfellow, Tennyson, Frances Trollope, Wilde, Kipling, Twain, and Frances Hodgson Burnett. Students will participate as “first readers” contributing to the revision and editing process for a book of essays on transatlantic studies pedagogy currently being prepared by the co-teachers for the course. Students will present a report on a piece of secondary criticism representative of transatlanticism as a scholarly approach which emphasizes textual production and circulation in an historically situated rhetorical context. Students will also introduce and lead discussion of an assigned primary text, focusing on methods of analysis from their own areas of interest and expertise (e.g., literacy studies, digital humanities, authorship, rhetorical study of literature). In addition, they will do research on the role that periodicals played in promoting trans-Atlantic literary production in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and prepare a major project in line with their individual long-term research goals. Depending upon the focus envisioned for the major project, students should enroll in either the American or the British “side” of the two sign-up options for the seminar: ENGL 80453 (British) or ENGL 80503 (American). The course will be team-taught by specialists in American and British print culture.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: National/Transnational/Comparative Approaches; Research Methods/Methodology

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Rhetoric and Culture; Textual-Scholarly Production

Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations

 

ENGL 80463.055 :: Postcolonial Literature: Global Modernisms
Dr. Karen Steele
R 2:00 - 4:40

In the recent PMLA survey of “The New Modernist Studies,” Douglas Mao and Rebecca Walkowitz use the term “expansion” to characterize modernist studies revitalized in the twenty-first century. Our seminar on Global Modernism will be “expanding” modernism in three dimensions: spatially, temporally, and vertically. First, we will be examining transactions among modernist practices in a range of English-speaking countries, from the UK and Ireland to the US and India. Second, we will be considering modernist practices that emerged earlier than the typical start date of 1914. And finally, we will be challenging the monolithic idea of High Modernism by locating modernism’s verticality in nineteenth-century innovations in technology, and in particular, those that gave rise to new forms of mass communication, from the high-speed rotary press to the half-tone block for photographic reproduction.

 

We will thus read classic modernist authors such as Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot alongside global writers such as Rabindranath Tagore, Swarnakumari Devi, and Claude McKay. We will also study “High” literary forms together with mass culture, such as high-circulating newspapers. There will be an archival component to the course, as students will conduct original research on periodicals. To guide our travel through different geographical locations, we will be drawing on both classic and current scholarship in postcolonial theories.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: National/Transnational/Comparative Approaches; Theory

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Theory

Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations

ENGL 80703.015 :: Seminar in Rhetoric: Propaganda and Rhetorical Argument
Dr. Rich Enos
TR 9:30 - 10:50

This course examines prominent works that cover the study of discourse ranging from rational systems of jurisprudential reasoning to the willful distortion and manipulation of language for covert (and often unethical) motives. This course covers topics that emphasize theory, research and the application of strategies seeking to attain agreement, to shape attitudes, to motivate to action, and to change behavior.

 

Tentative readings include (but limited to) the following texts:

  • Enos, Richard Leo. The Literate Mode of Cicero’s Legal Rhetoric.
  • Jowett, Garth and Victoria O’Donnell. Propaganda & Persuasion. Fifth edition.
  • O’Keefe, Daniel J. Persuasion: Theory and Research. Second edition.
  • Perelman, Chaim and L. Olbrechts-Tyteca, The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation.
  • Stewart, Charles J., Craig Allen Smith, and Robert E. Denton, Jr. Persuasion and Social Movements. Sixth edition.

Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Rhetoric and Culture; Theory
English Studies Degree Outcomes: Theory

Program Outcomes: Students should be familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work; Students should be able to conduct research independently.

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Graduate Courses: Spring 2013

60703 Introduction to Composition Studies Leverenz 2-­‐4:40 Th E-­‐mail: c.leverenz@tcu.edu

This course is intended as an introduction to the field of composition studies—its history, research, theory, and pedagogy. While one goal of the course is to provide you with an understanding of the theoretical rationales for a range of approaches to the teaching of writing, another goal is to make you conversant in the key terms, major figures, and current conversations in composition. Guiding questions for the course will include: 1) What is composition studies and how did it come to be? 2) What is the work of composition studies, especially beyond the delivery of required first-­‐ year composition courses? 3) What is the relationship between theory, research, and the practice of composition? 4) How is composition studies changing—and how should it change? Course Outcomes At the end of this course, students will be able to • Demonstrate familiarity with this history of composition studies as a field • Identify relationships between cultural forces and institutionalized writing instruction • Demonstrate familiarity with multiple pedagogical approaches to the teaching of writing • Demonstrate familiarity with key terms and approaches to research and theory that is foundation to composition studies as a field (Preliminary) List of Required Texts James Berlin, Rhetoric and Reality: Writing Instruction in American Colleges 1900-­‐1985. Southern Illinois UP, 1987. James J. Murphy, ed. A Short History of Writing Instruction, 3rd ed. Routledge 2012 Gary Tate, Amy Rupiper, and Kurt Schick, eds. A Guide to Composition Pedagogies. Oxford P 2000 [ if new edition is available ] Victor Villanueva, ed. Cross-­‐Talk in Comp Theory: A Reader 3rd ed. NCTE, 2011 Jody Shipka, Toward a Composition Made Whole, U of Pittsburgh P, 2011 Sid Dobrin, PostComposition Southern Illinois UP, 2012 Additional readings as assigned. Course requirements: Regular attendance and participation; Discussion Leading; Weekly responses; Annotated Bibliography and Report; Final Project; Digital Course Portfolio (to include most of the above) Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Composition & Literacy; Pedagogy English Studies Degree Outcomes: Theory Program Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations

60723 Research Practices in Composition & Rhetoric Lucas 6-­‐8:40 M Required Course for Rhet/Comp Ph.D. degree. E-­‐Mail: b.e.lucas2@tcu.edu

In this seminar, we will cover methods and theories of research practiced in Rhetoric and Composition, situated alongside literary analysis in particular and epistemology across the disciplines in general. Given the field's explorations and debates over methodology, the seminar is designed for all graduate students in English, especially those who are interested in interdisciplinary work or want to enrich their understanding of knowledge production in academia. We will focus primarily on 20th century developments in research, with attention to epistemological issues, institutional influences, textual analysis, archival resources, scholarly writing genres, research ethics, and methods ranging from quantitative-­‐experimental studies to qualitative-­‐ethnographic approaches. Readings will be extensive, including (but not limited to) Janice M. Lauer and J. William Asher, Composition Research: Empirical Designs (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988); Mary Sue MacNealy, Strategies for Empirical Research in Writing (Longman, 1998); Stephen M. North, The Making of Knowledge in Composition: Portrait of an Emerging Field (Upper Monclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1987); and selected journal articles and book chapters. Seminar participants will write weekly reading responses, a literature review of 10-­‐15 sources appropriate to a prospectus or grant proposal, and short analytic essays of particular studies; in addition, participants will work collectively with primary research data and conduct an interview with a scholar active in her or his field. Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Research Methods/Methodology; Textual/Scholarly Production English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods/Methodology, Textual/Scholarly Production Program Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently; students should understand how to write for publication

70573 American Non-­‐Fiction Prose: Letters and Letter Writing in U.S. Literature and Culture, 1790-­‐1860 Gaul M 2-­‐4:40 E-­‐Mail: t.gaul@tcu.edu

From the influence of the epistolary mode on the earliest American novels to the wide range of letters published in periodicals in the nineteenth-­‐century to the vast archives of yet unexplored letters in libraries around the country, letters have profoundly shaped American culture. As the literary genre most available to the widest range of writers, the epistolary has much to reveal to students of literature about genre, identity (race, class, and gender), authorship, and power. The study of letters also is central for students in rhetoric and composition because of the ways epistolarity foregrounds the intersections between orality and writing, letter-­‐writers' rhetorical positionings, pedagogical instruction in letter writing, and literacy practices. In the first section of the course, we will begin by grounding ourselves in the cutting edge theoretical and historical insights of the emerging interdisciplinary field of Epistolary Studies. We will consider the status of the epistolary in the late eighteenth century by reading letters by Phillis Wheatley, Samson Occom (Mohawk), and others. We will also interrogate the connections between the epistolary form and the emerging genre of the novel, reading Hannah Foster's The Coquette and Crevecoeur's Letters from an American Farmer. In the second section, we will consider archives of published and unpublished letters emerging out of the Cherokee Crisis of the 1820s and 30s as sites of racial, gender, cultural, religious, and political contestation. Finally, in the third section, we will consider the longstanding linking of women and epistolarity by examining women writers' various uses of the letter form in antebellum literature. Texts we may consider include Angelina and Sarah Grimke's published letters on women's rights and abolition, Caroline Kirkland's A New Home, Who'll Follow?, Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Lydia Maria Child's Letters from New-­‐York. Throughout the course, we will study the practices and discuss the politics of documentary editing. The culminating project will be the production of an edition of letters, prepared according to current standards for documentary editing, accompanied by a scholarly introduction and annotations. English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre/ Textual-­‐Scholarly Production Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual/Scholarly Production Program Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently; students should understand how to write for publication

80123 Seminar in Literary Theory: Feminist Theory Steele W 2-­‐4:40 E-­‐Mail: k.steele@tcu.edu (The course is cross listed with WOST 60003; It Is a Required Course for WOST Graduate Certificate so priority in registration by permit will be given to WOST Graduate Certificate students; contact Director of Women's Studies Dr. Theresa Gaul t.gaul@tcu.edu ) ENGL 80123 (cross-­‐listed as WOST 60003) is a required course for graduate students pursuing the Certificate in Women's Studies at TCU.

This colloquium will provide graduate students across the disciplines with a thorough grounding in feminism and feminist and gender theory from the late eighteen century to the present; it will also expose students to current feminist methodologies and require students to practice these methods in original research related to their own area of burgeoning expertise. In addition to tracing feminism from a historical perspective, we will compare feminism methods in four key disciplines: English studies, history, religion, and art history. Readings will be primarily theoretical essays and book chapters, uploaded to eCollege and placed on reserve at the library. English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods/methodology; Theory Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Theory Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations.

80413 Seminar in Shakespeare: Shakespeare & After: Contexts and Approaches to Gender & Difference Balizet 2-­‐4:40 T E-­‐Mail: a.balizet@tcu.edu

Focusing on several major plays including Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet, and The Tempest, this course aims to familiarize students from all backgrounds with the dramatic works of William Shakespeare and his enduring influence—or "afterlife"—within literary and performing arts over the past 400 years. In part, this course is meant to give students a solid foundation in Shakespeare's most popular plays for later scholarly and pedagogical work in all fields. By engaging historical contexts of and contemporary theoretical approaches to issues of gender, sexuality, race, religion, and the body, our study of Shakespeare's plays will attend in particular to the diverse rhetorical and cultural debates that shaped his world and the ways in which the plays reveal or respond to those pressures. In addition, we will examine Shakespearean afterlives through dramatic, prose, cinematic, sociological, and new media adaptations of Shakespeare's characters and plays, ranging from 19th century "family" Shakespeares to Aimé Césaire's 1969 A Tempest and Mary Pipher's Reviving Ophelia. Core questions will include: ·∙ What issues of gender and difference shaped Shakespeare's major works? How does contemporary criticism (Girls' Studies, post-­‐colonialism, presentism) enrich our understanding of Shakespeare in a historical context? ·∙ To what degree does Shakespeare's engagement with the cultural controversies of his day enable/impede his endurance as a literary icon? ·∙ How is Shakespeare's name used as a force of cultural or rhetorical authority? How has his cultural or rhetorical authority been deployed in historical and current debates on gender and difference? ·∙ How has Shakespeare operated within pop/popular/youth/girl culture through time? What issues of gender and difference emerge through the study of Shakespeare's afterlives? ·∙ How do we use contemporary adaptations or iterations of Shakespeare's plays in literary analysis and secondary or undergraduate teaching? In addition to weekly reading responses, students will produce a conference-­‐style presentation and a final project on the "afterlife" phenomenon of their choice. Final projects can take a variety of forms (including scholarly essay or pedagogical portfolio and presentation), and students will be encouraged to explore Shakespearean afterlives from their home scholarly or literary field. English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Approaches, National/Transnational/Comparative Approaches. Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations

80533 Literature of Latina/o Diaspora: Latino Poetics Colon 2-­‐4:40 F. E-­‐Mail: david.colon@tcu.edu

This course will examine a diverse body of poetry and poetics (i.e. essays, manifestoes, criticism, and aesthetic defenses) from the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-­‐first century. The focus will be on remarkable aesthetic innovations in form, voice, and the uses of material language germinating from literary movements in dialogue with political and cultural changes in the Americas as a result of multicultural and multinational encounters. The term "Latino" will be stretched to encompass the entire demographic of "Ibero-­‐American"-­‐-­‐that is to say, cultures in the Americas descended frm Spanish and Portuguese colonization of the entire continent, North and South. Readings will venture into various topics and the writings of an eclectic mix of authors, such as Ernest Fenollosa, George Santayana, William Carlos Williams, Salomon de la Selva, Haroldo de Campos, Luis Pales Matos, Alurista, Tato Laviera, Guillermo Gomez-­‐Pena, Rodrigo Toscano, Rosa Alcala, and even the Mexican-­‐American Elvis impersonator, El Vez. Assignments will include weekly response papers, seminar presentations, and a research-­‐based multimedia oral presentation intended to take the form of an academic conference panel talk. Spanish or Portuguese proficiency is not required by any means; essentially all texts will be in English or English translation. English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre, National/Transnational/Comparative Approaches Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Textual/Scholarly Production Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; students should understand how to write for publication

80703 Seminar in Rhetoric: Propaganda & Rhetorical Argument Enos 9:30-­‐10:50 T/Th E-­‐Mail: r.enos@tcu.edu Office: 2015E Scharbauer Hall

This course examines prominent works that cover the study of discourse ranging from rational systems of jurisprudential reasoning to the willful distortion and manipulation of language for covert (and often unethical) motives. This course covers topics that emphasize theory, research and the application of strategies seeking to attain agreement, to shape attitudes, to motivate to action, and to change behavior. Tentative readings include (but limited to) the following texts: Enos, Richard Leo. The Literate Mode of Cicero's Legal Rhetoric. Jowett, Garth and Victoria O'Donnell. Propaganda & Persuasion. Fifth edition. O'Keefe, Daniel J. Persuasion: Theory and Research. Second edition. Perelman, Chaim and L. Olbrechts-­‐Tyteca, The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation. Stewart, Charles J., Craig Allen Smith, and Robert E. Denton, Jr. Persuasion and Social Movements. Sixth edition. Rhetoric and Composition Degree Outcomes: Rhetoric and Culture; Theory English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods/methodology; Theory Program Outcomes: Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations; Students should be familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work.

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Graduate Courses: Fall 2012

ENGL 50253.015 :: Classical Rhetoric
Dr. Rich Enos
TR 9:30 - 10:50

This course examines the emergence of rhetoric in Antiquity and traces the impact of classical rhetoric up to the Middle Ages. A substantial amount of the course is devoted to learning about the relationship between oral and written discourse, the impact of literacy, the adaptability of systems of communication to technology and society, and the relationship of rhetoric and religion. The implications of such phenomena are examined in different periods in an effort to develop an historical perspective about the relationship between cognition and expression within cultural conditions.

 

Students are assigned short response-type statements on a regular basis. All of these short writing assignments are equally weighted and will constitute 70% of the final grade. One of these responses will be revised and will count 20% of the final grade. In addition to the requirements listed above, independent factors, which will account for the remaining 10% of the final grade, include regular attendance, preparation and participation as judged by the instructor. Late work, if accepted, will normally receive a grade reduction as deemed appropriate by the instructor.

 

Course Objectives and Outcomes:

1. to understand the relationship between thought and expression;

2. to demonstrate a mastery of ancient rhetorical theory;

3. to apply principles of classical criticism to the analysis of discourse;

4. to be sensitive to how context shapes meaning and understanding;

5. to understand the relationship(s) between rhetoric and religion;

6. to realize how rhetoric was a source of power in Antiquity.

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre; Textual/Scholarly Production


Program Outcomes: Students should be able to research independently; students should understand how to write for publication

ENGL 60113.779 :: Intro to Grad Studies & the Profession
Dr. Brad Lucas
M 5:00 - 7:40

 

English Studies is a broad term encompassing the diverse work done in contemporary English Departments, which often include literary studies, rhetoric and composition studies, creative writing, linguistics, and many other areas of our discipline. This seminar is an introduction to English Studies as a profession. The central goal of this course is to introduce students to the larger context of the profession so that you can use your graduate education to prepare to make a contribution within the many and varied discussions and debates ongoing in the disciplines associated with English. Over the semester, we will explore the history of the discipline in order to understand development and change in methods and theories in relation to the various institutional and intellectual contexts from which they emerged. This exploration will allow us to see the entwined paths of various kinds of work within contemporary English Departments. We will also look close to home at the TCU English Department, to see how the graduate faculty and their research projects represent fields and subfields, and how your research interests might fit into and mature within this department. Finally, we will consider the specific skills and strategies for study and research that will support your scholarly development.
 
Required course for Incoming graduate class

ENGL 60613.040 :: Teaching College Composition
Dr. Charlotte Hogg
T 4:00 - 6:40

Teaching College Composition (TCC), a graded 3-hour graduate course required for every new GI, is meant to provide pedagogical support—both theoretical and practical—throughout the first semester teaching writing at TCU. TCC continues the work begun in the pre-semester GI training you received and seeks to provide—and help you develop—resources, theories, concepts, and tools with which to teach 10803 and beyond. Our focus includes the immediate context surrounding your first teaching experience at TCU and your professional and theoretical development as a teacher more broadly. This class provides a space for discussion of classroom issues and ideas, but we will also concentrate on putting your classroom experiences into broader theoretical and pedagogical discussions by engaging with current composition theory. The course objectives, then, are to: 1) support your development as a teacher; 2) engage with composition theory and teaching composition at TCU to gain an understanding of the cohesiveness of the whole writing program; and 3) theorize and reflect on your teaching practices. Likely texts include The St. Martin's Guide for Teaching Writing, Personally Speaking: Experience as Evidence in Academic Discourse, Writing New Media, and online supplemental articles from CCC, College English, and more.

 

Required course for all incoming graduate instructors


Program Outcomes: Students should be familiar with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work; students should be able to develop courses in their field of specialization; Students should demonstrate competency using technology.

ENGL 60733.080 :: Language and Theory
Dr. Joddy Murray
W 5:00 - 7:40

Conceptions of language drive many practices in English studies, but especially in Rhetoric & Composition. How language is theorized affects teaching practices, writing practices, curricular practices, disciplinary practices, and professional practices. On one hand, some theorists claim that language operates on a coding/decoding model, allowing a one-to-one correspondence between the signs we use and the meanings we convey. On the other hand, other theorists claim language operates somewhere between meaning and the signs we use—in fact, the ambiguity language creates as it attempts to objectify thought is exactly its most generative and powerful quality. In between, many variations exist about the relationship between thought and language—and this course will discuss and unpack many of them.

 

But it is not enough for you to read about various theories on language; you will also do theory. Whether it is a small contribution to a well-known, existing interpretation of language, or whether it is a whole new theory of rhetoric and the relationship between thought and language, you will learn to construct and make visible your own views on language while in this course.

 

Readings include works from Volosinov, Vygotsky, Bakhtin, Cassirer, Langer, Heidegger, Horkheimer/Adorno, Derrida, Foucault, de Certeau, Chomsky, and Porter.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods/Methodology; Theory

 

Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently.

ENGL 70403 :: British Novel II: Victorian Fiction and its Afterlives
Dr. Linda Hughes
M 2:00 - 4:40

This course aims to familiarize specialist and nonspecialist students with 6 major works of Victorian fiction and 2 popular titles while also exploring why Victorian fiction continues to inspire contemporary adaptations, remediations, and rewritings in the 21st century.  Familiarity with canonical works, including Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, W. M. Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, and Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, will strengthen participants’ preparedness for specialist and generalist teaching. Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Aurora Floyd will additionally introduce participants to the important popular genre of Victorian sensation fiction (and the mid-Victorian phenomenon of the “fast” woman), while Arthur Conan Doyle’s Adventures of Sherlock Holmes represents the rise of popular short fiction and a bestseller of the 1890s that remains in print today.

 

That all the preceding titles except Aurora Floyd have inspired recent films or television serials, or answering fiction ranging from Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) to Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs (1998) to Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot (2011), also indicates that these works somehow speak to or engage issues of 21st-century postmodern culture. Victorian novels are thus inseparable from contemporary popular culture and contemporary fiction.  The lively afterlife of Victorian fiction has also inspired a new scholarly subfield, neo-Victorianism, and its peer-reviewed, online Journal of Neo-Victorian Studies (http://www.neovictorianstudies.com/).

 

This seminar will also introduce participants to historical as well as contemporary media studies. Of the course texts, only Jane Eyre was published as a free-standing, two-volume novel. Vanity Fair (1847-1848) and Middlemarch (1871-1872) were issued in paper-covered parts, and all the others were serialized in Victorian magazines or newspapers.  In this sense, Victorian fiction, however canonical now, was also part of popular culture in its time. Course offerings will thus raise the opportunity for historical and theoretical approaches to canon formation, print culture, reception, remediation, and popular culture.

 

In addition to weekly written responses to readings, each student will report on one of the assigned text’s afterlife in the form of a novel or film that adapts, responds, or talks back to it.  I will be seeking a public outlet (e.g., the Fort Worth library, or a series at TCU) for participants to present the afterlife of Victorian fiction to a wider audience as a means of demonstrating the continuing relevance of historical studies to contemporary audiences.  In this last sense the course can also introduce students to community outreach and the potential role of public intellectuals. Note: either the “afterlife” project or another topic of the student’s choice can form the basis of a semester project (12-25 pp.) suitable for journal submission or a conference presentation.


English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Approaches/Genre/Textual-Scholarly Production

 

Program Outcomes: Students will develop familiarity with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences and other outlets for scholarly work; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations.

 

ENGL 70593 :: Authorship in American Literary Culture
Dr. Sarah Robbins
T 1:00 - 3:40

Drawing on a range of research approaches, students in this seminar will explore the place and practice of authorship in American culture, historically and today. Examples of topics that may be examined are listed below:

  • What key trends in the professionalization of authorship can we trace across time in American literary history, and how have past and recent developments in the marketplace influenced (would-be) authors' work?
  • How have specific audience expectations, genre conventions, and social reading practices influenced approaches to authorship in US and transnational contexts?
  • What is gained and lost from a national (US-based) focus on authorship in cultural context and/versus a comparative or broadened view of "American" writerly practice?
  • How can theory and differing approaches to research inform the study of particular American writers' careers? Of issues associated with the practice of authorship (e.g., access to authorial production and circulation venues by potential writers)?
  • What important scholarship has emerged in recent years around such key issues as intellectual property and authorship, textual ownership both legal and ethical, collaborative authorship, and social media's impact on the practice of authorship?
  • As scholars and thus authors ourselves, and as teachers mentoring student authors, what ethical and practical issues of authorial practice should we address from an informed perspective, and how can we apply that learning?

Tentative "core" reading list:

  • Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist
  • Candice Spigelman, Across Property Lines: Textual Ownership in Writing Groups (or journal essay that was the basis for this book)
  • Zitkala-Ša, American Indian Stories, Legends and Other Writings
  • Jack London, Martin Eden
  • Joe Moran, Star Authors
  • Stephen King, On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft
  • Paul John Eakin, ed., The Ethics of Life Writing
  • Issues of Our Time: The Help, special issue of JENdA: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies. 2011.
  • [Introduction and one additional article of your choice]
  • Cecilia Konchar Farr, Reading Oprah: How Oprah's Book Club Changed the Way America Reads

Individualized readings selected by students:

  • Collection of four or five scholarly essays related to individual projects on authorship
  • Book-length scholarly study of an American author's career OR of an issue related to authorship in American culture

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Research Methods; National/Transnational/ Comparative Approaches

 

Program Outcomes: Students should be able to conduct research independently; Students will develop familiarity with appropriate journals, prof. organizations; conferences and other outlets for scholarly work; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations.

 

ENGL 80513 :: Seminar in American Literature since 1900: William Faulkner
Dr. David Vanderwerken
R 2:00 - 4:40

This seminar is an intensive examination of five of Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County novels from his "major phase," 1929-1942. We will learn something of the regional, social, and intellectual background that informs Faulkner's world. Through lecture and discussion, we will analyze Faulkner's themes, characters, and techniques. Further, we will familiarize ourselves with Faulkner's critical reputation over time, and we will survey the history of Faulkner studies to the present.

 

Course requirements consist of

  • a survey of recent criticism on a text (20%);
  • a review of a recent book in Faulkner studies (20%);
  • a 15-20 minute conference presentation (20%):
  • a formal written version of the presentation (20%);
  • a comprehensive in-class final examination (20%).

Required Texts (Vintage International Trade Editions Only):

  • William Faulkner. Light in August. 1932. New York: Vintage International Edition, 1990.
  • ---. Sanctuary. 1931. New York: Vintage International Edition, 1993.
  • ---. The Sound and the Fury. 1929. New York: Vintage International Edition, 1990.
  • ---. Absalom, Absalom! 1936. New York: Vintage International Edition, 1990.
  • ---. Go Down, Moses. 1942. New York: Vintage International Edition, 1990.
  • Eric J. Sundquist. Faulkner: The House Divided. 1983. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1985.

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre and Historical Engagement

 

Program Outcomes: Students will develop familiarity with appropriate journals, prof. organizations; conferences and other outlets for scholarly work; Students will be able to give effective scholarly presentations.

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Graduate Courses: Spring 2012

 

ENGL 50233 :: Studies in Creative Writing—Graduate Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Alex Lemon
M 2:00 - 4:40

Each week students will produce original pieces of creative nonfiction, discuss works in a variety of nonfiction genres (Didion, Febos, Gessner, Greil Marcus, Nabakov, Matthew Power, Curtis White), and workshop student-produced writing. Half of class time will be spent looking at craft/aesthetic issues raised by the assigned texts; the other half will be spent workshopping student writing. Long form CNF, the interaction between form and content and the use of techniques most often associated with fiction/poetry will be given specific focus. Requirements include weekly writing assignments, journal writing, presentation and analysis of texts, weekly reading assignments, and thoughtful peer workshopping, regular attendance.

 

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Genre; Textual/Scholarly Production
Program Outcomes: Writing for Publication

ENGL 60113 :: Intro to Grad Studies & the Profession
Dr. Neil Easterbrook
W 2:00 - 4:40

 

English Studies is a broad term encompassing the diverse work done in contemporary English Departments, which often include literary studies, rhetoric and composition studies, creative writing, linguistics, and many other areas of our discipline. This seminar is an introduction to English Studies as a profession. The central goal of this course is to introduce students to the larger context of the profession so that you can use your graduate education to prepare to make a contribution within the many and varied discussions and debates ongoing in the disciplines associated with English. Over the semester, we will explore the history of the discipline in order to understand development and change in methods and theories in relation to the various institutional and intellectual contexts from which they emerged. This exploration will allow us to see the entwined paths of various kinds of work within contemporary English Departments. We will also look close to home at the TCU English Department, to see how the graduate faculty and their research projects represent fields and subfields, and how your research interests might fit into and mature within this department. Finally, we will consider the specific skills and strategies for study and research that will support your scholarly development.
 
This is a required course for Incoming graduate class

ENGL 60453 :: The Long Eighteenth Century
Dr. Mona Narain
T 4:00 - 6:40

This course will introduce students to eighteenth-century British Literature through the lens of contemporary critical debates and topics of scholarly interest.  From the “rise” of print culture and the “rise” of the novel to new kinds of networks such as banks, prisons, highways, stock exchanges, newspapers, dictionaries and circulating libraries, the eighteenth-century’s early modernity offers us a compelling location to explore important questions about genre, cultural circulations and historical phenomena that engage our attention today.  We will read a variety of eighteenth-century texts in different genres in thematic groups--Early Modern Spaces and Print, Satire and its Discontents, The Dialectic of Enlightenment and Rhetoric, the Global Eighteenth-Century and Colonialism, and Novelisms, Gender and Sexuality—pairing eighteenth-century texts with contemporary theoretical and scholarly commentaries.

 
For example, as we read a play by Aphra Behn and selections from The Spectator and the Female Tatler paired with Jurgen Habermas and Henri Lefebvre’s descriptions of new spatial divisions in early modern Europe, we will examine how the space of Restoration Theater and enabled the appearance of professional women authors in print for the first time, and how coffeehouses helped establish periodicals as a new genre and enhanced their circulation as literary and cultural artifacts. As we think about the question “What is Enlightenment?” we will read Alexander Pope, the Earl of Rochester, Hugh Blair and Mary Astell in the company of Clifford Siskin and William Warner’s description of the Enlightenment in 2010 as a history of mediation engaging not only with “oral, visual, written, and printed media, but everything that intervenes, enables, supplements, or is simply in between.” While the course is an introduction to eighteenth-century texts, the course invites participants with different interests, be it literature or rhetoric and composition, to explore eighteenth-century thought and literature from their own specific vantage points. We will have conversations with some of the scholars whose work we will read through video conferencing.  The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) will hold its 2012 annual meeting in San Antonio giving students the potential opportunity to attend one of the biggest multidisciplinary Eighteenth-Century Studies conferences in the world.

 

Anticipated Texts and Authors: An eighteenth-century anthology and some additional editions; Aphra Behn, Margaret Cavendish, Daniel Defoe, Addison & Steele, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Hugh Blair, Samuel Johnson, William Hogarth Samuel Richardson, Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Robinson are some of the authors we will read.

 

Anticipated Requirements: Bi-weekly 2 page papers; archival project working with ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online) or the Harry Ransom collection at UT or a new media assignment such as a Prezi presentation or an audio-visual response; and Seminar paper.


English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Textual/Scholarly Engagement
Program Outcomes: Conduct research independently; writing for publication; demonstrate competency in using technology

ENGL 60803 :: Literature Pedagogy
Dr. Linda Hughes
MW 10:00 - 10:50
lab section (Intro to Lit): MWF 11:00 - 11:50

This course will introduce you to the history, theory, and practice of teaching literature to prepare you to teach literature in the undergraduate classroom.  Because you will be practice teaching on occasion and observing others, a lab section of Introduction to Literature (English 10133), with a projected focus on Literature and/as Learning, will be attached to the graduate course.  You will not be attending or practice teaching in the Introduction to Literature course every day, but you should ensure that you have no conflicts with the lab course so that you are available to participate in it as appropriate.
The learning outcomes, action steps, and assignments/assessments of Literature Pedagogy are listed below:

Learning Outcome 1: Students will demonstrate the ability to conceptualize and plan the teaching of an undergraduate literature course. Action Steps: Students will read theories of teaching literature, explore approaches to teaching literature in academic books and journals, and will receive training in planning a course, including syllabus and assignment writing, grading techniques for essays and exams, incorporating technology, and formulating learning outcomes and assessments.

 

Learning Outcome 2: Students will demonstrate the ability to teach literature on a trial basis. Action Steps: Students will teach a work of literature in a mock or actual literature classroom in the presence of faculty and fellow apprentice teachers who will offer peer review.

 

Outcomes Assessments: The outcomes will be assessed through each student’s compilation of a portfolio by the course’s end, to include the following:

  1. a teaching credo (a personal statement of the goals and values that drive the student in teaching literature [ungraded but an essential component of professional reflection])
  2. a teaching philosophy (a public statement of key aims and methods used in the literature classroom, a document suitable for sharing with search committees and hiring departments)
  3. a teaching observation report completed in the first three weeks of the semester
  4. two syllabi, one for a lower-division genre or introduction to literature course, one for a course specific to the student’s area of specialization (either a thematic Major British or Major American Writers course or an upper-division specialty course)
  5. Peer review comments about the student’s practice teaching of a literary work, and the student’s written response to these comments, with goals to address any problems that emerge in the practice teaching and review process
  6. Weekly responses (informal writing, 1-3 pp.) to readings and discussion about teaching
  7. A book report (5-7 pp.) on the contents of an MLA Approaches to Teaching in the student’s area of specialization, including a summary of contents and a constructive critical response of the work’s usefulness to the apprentice teacher’s professional development.  [If no appropriate MLA book is available, the student may propose an alternative collection of pedagogy essays, e.g., Teaching with the Records of Early English Drama, 2006, one of the Palgrave teaching series on teaching literature, e.g., Poetry and Pedagogy: The Challenge of the Contemporary, 2006, or 15-20 related essays in assorted books and professional journals.]

Required Course for English Studies PhDs
Program Outcomes: familiarity with appropriate journals, professional organizations, conferences, and other outlets for scholarly work; develop courses in field of specialization.

ENGL 80713 :: Seminar in Literacy
Dr. Charlotte Hogg
T 1:00 - 3:40

Seminar in Literacy:  Introduction to Literacy Studies is designed as an introduction to the vast research area of literacy studies, typically considered a subfield within (or some might argue a co-field of) composition and rhetoric.  Literacy studies is concerned with cultural, political, economic, and educational factors that impact and shape how people regard literacy in their lives, communities, and work.  The course will begin and be sustained by considering shifting definitions of literacy—or, more accurately, literacies—within scholarship that ranges from histories to theories to literacy narratives and ethnographies.  We will consider a myriad of ways literacies are developed, practiced, and valued within American culture.  Along the way, we will engage in discussions of research methodologies within literacy studies, particularly as they influence and are influenced by changing definitions of literacy.  Course assignments will likely include shorter reading responses, a project that engages literacy in the community, a collaborative book review, and a final project and presentation. 

 

Course texts will (likely) include:

  • Literacy: A Critical Sourcebook, eds. Ellen Cushman, Eugene R. Kintgen, Barry M. Kroll, and Mike Rose
  • Women and Literacy: Local and Global Inquiries for the 21st Century, eds. Beth Daniell and Peter Mortensen
  • What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy, James Paul Gee
  • Literacy and Racial Justice: the Politics of Learning after Brown v. Board of Education, Catherine Prendergast
  • Literacy Myths, Legacies, and Lessons: New Studies on Literacy, by Harvey J. Graff
  • Literacy in American Lives, Deborah Brandt
  • The Mind at Work, Mike Rose
  • and more

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Theory
Program Outcomes: Conduct research independently; give effective scholarly presentation.

ENGL 80743 :: Seminar in Burke
Dr. Ann George
R 1:00 - 3:40

This seminar will be a thorough examination of perhaps the most important and interesting American rhetorical theorist of this century.  Designed for students in rhetoric or literature,* this course will include a careful consideration of Burke's major theoretical and literary work with particular emphasis on his writing before 1940 and the ways in which his rhetorical theory and methodologies grew out of his own literary practice and his engagement in modernist conversations about the function of art (and language, more generally) in culture. That is, we will investigate Burke's overriding interest in how language works—what effects texts (of all kinds) can have and how they create these effects.  While we will be attending to the canonical Burke, the course will also introduce students to little-known or little-read Burke materials (including magazine articles, short stories, and bits from his massive correspondence). In addition, by providing an opportunity to explore Burke's relationships with other thinkers and, in particular, other American writers of the first half of the century, this course problematizes the standard representation of Burke as the eccentric hermit of Andover farm.

 

*Burke wrote poetry, fiction, and lots of literary criticism (especially on Shakespeare and modernist poets); in addition, much of his work in the 1930s-40s resulted from his interaction with the literary left and with the theorists who would become the New Critics. Because he sees all language as rhetorical, he provides useful methodologies for examining all kinds of texts.


Primary Burke Texts: 

  • Counter-Statement (1931);
  • Auscultation, Creation, and Revision (written 1932);
  • Permanence and Change (1935);
  • Attitudes Toward History (1937);
  • selections from Philosophy of Literary Form (1941);
  • Grammar of Motives (1945);
  • Rhetoric of Motives (1950);
  • and selections from Language as Symbolic Action (1966). 

Main secondary text: George and Selzer, Kenneth Burke in the 1930s.

 

Likely Requirements:  Weekly response papers; short new media presentation; conference style abstract; seminar paper (I’ll be encouraging—but not requiring—you to make use of the Burke archives).


English Studies Degree Outcomes: Research Methods & Methodology; Theory
Program Outcomes: Conduct research independently; demonstrate competency in using technology

ENGL 80583 :: Contemporary African-American Lit
Dr. Australia Tarver
R 4:00 - 6:40

The literary traditions which are a legacy of the African American past—slavery and emancipation, migration and displacement, segregation (Jim Crow) and civil rights—have spawned a variety of literary characteristics which can be identified as particularly African American in character: transnationalizing the African experience, masking and signifying, language performance, troping the blues or employing the icons and events of slavery. In this seminar, through reading fiction, poetry, essays, and theoretical/critical sources, we will explore and uncover more characteristics, such as race and gender binaries, identity politics, and counter-hegemonic strategies. The value of such an exploration will allow us to see how black writers have evolved from the Harlem Renaissance into a kind of post-modern consciousness. The course design will focus on individual presentations which offer analyses of the assigned readings drawn from primary and secondary texts.

 

Students will be asked to write 2 short papers (a minimum of 5 pages) and a final paper (15 pp. or more). The objectives of these papers are to offer new approaches while building on new and existing criticism. Ostensibly, students could use the 2 papers to build the final paper; or ideally, students might have 3 different papers to read at conferences, develop further, publish, or serve as one part of a dissertation or thesis.

 

Selected texts:

  • Dana Williams, Contemporary African American Fiction;
  • Quashie. New Bones: Contemp. Blk. Writers;
  • Reed. Reckless Eyeballing;
  • Walker, Possessing the Secret of Joy;
  • Jones. Corregidora;
  • Kenan. Visitation of Spirits;
  • Johnson. Middle Passage;
  • Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory.

English Studies Degree Outcomes: Historical Engagement; Textual/Scholarly Production
Program Outcomes: Familiarity with appropriate journals; professional organizations, conferences and other outlets for scholarly work; how to write for publication.

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Graduate Courses: Fall 2011

ENGL 60513 :: Teaching College Composition
Dr. Charlotte Hogg
MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.

Teaching College Composition (TCC), a graded 3-hour graduate course required for every new GI, is meant to provide pedagogical support—both theoretical and practical—throughout the first semester teaching writing at TCU. TCC continues the work begun in the pre-semester GI training you received and seeks to provide—and help you develop—resources, theories, concepts, and tools with which to teach 10803 and beyond. Our focus includes the immediate context surrounding your first teaching experience at TCU and your professional and theoretical development as a teacher more broadly. This class provides a space for discussion of classroom issues and ideas, but we will also concentrate on putting your classroom experiences into broader theoretical and pedagogical discussions by engaging with current composition theory. The course objectives, then, are to: 1) support your development as a teacher; 2) engage with composition theory and teaching composition at TCU to gain an understanding of the cohesiveness of the whole writing program; and 3) theorize and reflect on your teaching practices. Likely texts include The St. Martin's Guide for Teaching Writing, Personally Speaking: Experience as Evidence in Academic Discourse, Writing New Media, and online supplemental articles from CCC, College English, and more.

60123 :: Intro to Modern Critical Theory
Dr. Neil Easterbrook
Mondays, 2:00 - 4:40 p.m.

The fall course will be subtitled “Thinking through Theory,” focused to introduce students to the specific ways that theoretical thinking differs from literary-critical thinking or from pedagogical thinking. The goal of the course will be, at least for this term, to reorient our approach from applications and results toward concepts and conditions, since the focus of theory is always to isolate presuppositions that form the foundation of our thought and then to subject those presuppositions to vigorous critique.

 

We’ll devote the semester to interrogating three particular concepts, ones that are central to any understanding of the arts and to rhetoric and composition as well: representation, ideology, and history. Since these are umbrella terms covering considerable ground, we’ll investigate their historical roots, reading materials from Classical Greece to last weekend, trying to see how the particular concept plays a significant role in any position on the arts, but also in claims about culture and society. For example, on representation we’ll juxtapose Plato with Foucault. Plato thought “representation” rendered art either insignificant or dangerous, though Foucault’s view moves the focus to the formal dynamics and effects they have on readers or viewers.

 

Throughout, our own focus will be on the concepts and the multiple questions and problems they precipitate—the role they play in any “practical” thinking, and what various consequences might ensue from whatever resolutions might be proffered. We will not attempt a survey of the many (not even the main) schools of modern criticism, even if a class could provide an adequate account within the limit of 15 weeks. Instead, the professor will devote individual tutoring to students who have interests in particular schools, or need scholarly overviews.

 

Three weeks of the course will do two things: two weeks will be devoted to “practical” examples — examining specifically how theoretical questions emerge from any kind of literary or cultural text (we’ll read a small pile of poems and either a short novel or some short fiction as study examples); a third week will be devoted to the careful analysis of two or three successful papers from recent professional journals—not in the attempt to examine their position(s) on representation, ideology or history but to try to articulate what scholarly writing does, and how we can follow such example to improve our own writing. It is likely that the class will begin and end with literature, and that the session on professional writing will take place roughly half-way through.

 

Students will be asked to be active participants in discussion, give one class presentation (typically on an assigned reading), and write a seminar paper. Anyone who has any interest in the course is invited to contact Neil with questions, concerns, or qualifying corrections (the professor, who actually admits his own fallibility, welcomes any sort of inquiry, especially one that interrogates the professor’s organizing assumptions), at n.Easterbrook@tcu.edu.

 

Probable texts: The Norton Anthology of Criticism and Theory (2/e), eds. Vincent Leitch et al.; poems by Amy Clampitt, Michael Davidson, Derek Walcott, John Ashbery, Jorie Graham, William Carlos Williams, and Adrienne Rich; and a short novel such as Toni Morrison’s Mercy, China Miéville’s The City & the City, or Haruki Murakami’s Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World.

 

Suggested for students who have never had a course in theory: Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (Jonathan Culler) and The Theory Toolbox (Jeffrey Nealon and Susan Searles Giroux).

ENGL 60503 :: Studies in Early American Literature—Early National Periodical Culture
Dr. Dan Williams
Tuesdays 5:00 - 7:40 p.m.

What is inside the American Magazine of Wonders, or The American Ladies Magazine? 

This seminar will examine early American magazines published between 1770 and 1830.  Using several remarkable databases, such as the American Periodical Series, Early American Imprints, and America’s Early Newspapers, students will be asked to explore both the general rise of magazines in early national print culture but also specific self-developed research topics focused on a specific periodical.  According to the APS, there were 656 periodicals published in the US from 1770 to 1830; there were over 500 newspapers published during the same period; and the Early American Imprint series contains over 100,000 titles published by American printers. Students will be encouraged to explore these new resources, and readings each week will focus on a specific periodical, time, and region.  Secondary readings will be taken from Davidson, Revolution and the Word; Starr, The Creation of the Media; and Lehuu, Carnivals of Print (among others).   General topics to be examined will be the rise of professional of authorship, the growth of a literary marketplace, the rise of discourse communities, and the revolutionary developments of early national print culture.

ENGL 60723 :: Research Practices in Rhetoric & Composition
Dr. Carrie Leverenz
Tuesdays 2:00 - 4:40 p.m.

This course will provide an introduction to common research methods in rhetorica and composition in three units: theorizing research methods, doing research, representing research. Along the way, we’ll consider the role of research in the growth of composition as a field, the relationship between rhetoric and composition as knowledge-making enterprises, the genres and processes of publishing research, and the ethics of planning/doing/publishing research.

 

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1) identify and describe common research methods in composition and rhetoric
2) articulate clear research questions and choose appropriate research methods for answering those questions
3) read research in composition and rhetoric with insight and critical awareness
4) present research in rhetorically appropriate and effective ways

 

Another goal is to enable students to make progress on their own research projects by working through a sample prospectus, workshopping ongoing research, or doing further research on the subject of research methodologies.

Tentative reading list:

  • Lisa Ede, ed. On Writing Research: The Braddock Essays 1975-1998
  • Ann Blakeslee and Cathleen Fleischer, Becoming a Writing Researcher.
  • Peter Mortensen and Gesa Kirsch, eds. Ethics and Representation in Qualitative Studies of Literacy
  • Andrea A. Lunsford, Kurt H. Wilson, Rosa A. Eberly, eds The SAGE handbook of rhetorical studies
  • Additional reading as assigned.

Writing assignments will include

  • Reading responses
  • Bibliography of selected research method
  • Presentation on an issue related to conducting research
  • Final project appropriate to your degree progress (draft of a prospectus, pilot research project,
As a class, we will workshop all final projects in draft form.

ENGL 70493 :: Victorian Literature and Periodicals—Mid-Victorian Culture Wars and Cultural Negotiation
Dr. Linda Hughes
Wednesdays 2:00 - 4:40 p.m.

This course has several dimensions: 

 

1) It is a history of media course introducing you to key scholarship (theory, criticism, history) about the first mass-media era, and research methods for investigating its most important mass medium, periodicals (newspapers, magazines, quarterly reviews).  Substantial time will be set aside in the course for you to do original archival research in this medium, which might include transatlantic and Anglo-Continental as well as British investigations over the course of the 19th century. 

 

2) It is also a foundational course in British literature insofar as we will be reading an array of essays, fiction, and poetry, many of them canonical (see below) first published in periodicals from the 1850s to the 1880s.  A recurring focus will be (in addition to the effect of periodical publication on literature’s production, distribution, reception, and significance) mid-century debates about literature’s social function and the claims of high and popular culture. 

 

3) A third important dimension of this course is its opportunity for professional development.  The Research Society of Victorian Periodicals will be holding its annual conference in September 2012 in Austin, Texas, with a theme of Sensation and Sentiment.  Those of you taking the course in Fall 2011 will have the opportunity to craft a conference proposal in time for the deadline for abstracts in late December 2011 or early 2012.

 

Media and Research Methods.  This course, however, explicitly asks you to go beyond assigned texts (4 novels, literary criticism, sundry poems, and selection from a Victorian “little magazine”) to create your own course materials: the fifth and ninth weeks of the seminar will be devoted to research you conduct in the periodical archive, which will in turn give us an opportunity to discuss appropriate research methods for discovering, identifying, and analyzing periodical content.  To shore up our study of media history we’ll be reading a number of secondary texts, including the recent Dynamics of Genre (2009) by Dallas Liddle, which investigates via Bakhtin what exactly we are reading in periodicals and the methods we can use to connect the contents and cultural contexts of periodicals.  He has volunteered to visit the class via Skype and I will be approaching Laurel Brake (a Green Visiting Professor to our department in 2008 and the premier scholar of Victorian periodicals today) to see if she can do so as well.   

 

Required texts (tentative):  The Woodlanders, by Thomas Hardy.  Recommended (these can be read in the Cornhill Magazine or, in Collins’s case, Harper’s Weekly [on-line] if you prefer not to buy textbooks):  Cousin Phillis, by Elizabeth Gaskell; Culture and Anarchy, by Matthew Arnold; Romola, by George Eliot; and The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins.  All poetry and most essays will be read in periodicals (largely available through the ProQuest database); most critical and theoretical texts will be available as pdfs on e-college. 

 

Required written assignments (tentative):  two short periodical research reports (3-5 pp.); 1 short report (1-2 pp.) on a critical/theoretical article or chapter; semester project (10-15 pp.). 

 

ENGL 70703 :: History of Rhetoric—Medieval to Modern
Dr. Rich Enos
Tuesday/Thursday 9:30 - 10:50 a.m.

Purpose

This course reviews the history of rhetoric from the Middle Ages through the Nineteenth Century.  Students read and discuss primary theories of rhetoric, related works of literature, and important scholarship. Students are not expected to have done prior work in the history of rhetoric or in rhetorical theory. A summary of classical rhetoric is provided at the beginning of the term.

Requirements

Students are given weekly reading assignments and are expected to come to class prepared to discuss those readings.  Students are required to submit short papers or responses on specific assignments throughout the semester.  Late papers received without an excuse deemed acceptable to the instructors will receive a grade reduction.  The average of these papers will be the basis for the final grade. Note: in addition to the papers mentioned above, prompt and regular attendance, preparation and participation will affect the final grade in a manner deemed appropriate by the instructor.

Readings (required)

  • Berlin, J. Writing Instruction in Nineteenth-Century American Colleges.
  • Bizzell and Herzberg (eds.). The Rhetorical Tradition (2nd ed.)
  • Glenn, Cheryl. Rhetoric Retold: Regendering the Tradition from Antiquity Through the Renaissance.
  • Kennedy, G. Classical Rhetoric & Its Christian and Secular Tradition from
    Ancient to Modern Times
    (2nd ed.)
  • Kleine, Michael. Searching for Latini.
  • Miller, T. The Formation of College English: Rhetoric and Belles Lettres in the British Cultural Provinces.
  • Murphy, J. A Short History of Writing Instruction (2nd ed.)

(Additional readings will be distributed in class.)

 

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Graduate Courses: Spring 2011

ENGL 60703 :: Introduction to Composition Studies—Theories of Composition
Dr. Brad Lucas
Mondays 1:00 - 3:40 p.m.

This seminar is designed to follow two trajectories, both that bear the name “theories of composition”: one focused on the vast terrain of theoretical perspectives about the practice and teaching of writing, the other focused on theories about the field of composition and rhetoric (what it is, how it came to be, and where it is going). Put another way, the seminar will approach theories about writing and about the discipline itself. Written requirements for this reading-intensive seminar will challenge participants to understand a range of complementary, and often contradictory, discourses within particular ideological and historical contexts. Throughout it all, we will consider the symbiotic, incestuous, mutually nurturing, role-troubling, cannibalistic, often schizophrenic—but always intriguing—love affair between composition studies and literary studies in the House of English.


Specifically, participants will be required to complete structured reading critiques, an analysis of an academic journal, a book review for an academic journal, and an article-length manuscript (or two conference-length papers). Participants will be expected to attend regularly, read extensively, serve as discussion leaders, and contribute to the direction of the seminar. In addition to selected articles and book chapters, course texts will include Textual Carnivals: The Politics of Composition (Miller); Composition-Rhetoric: Backgrounds, Theory, Pedagogy (Connors); Rhetoric and Reality (Berlin); and The Norton Book of Composition Studies (Miller).

 

ENGL 70553 :: American Poetry II
Dr. David Colon
Friday 1:00 - 3:40 p.m.

This course will explore "major poets and works" as measured by the standards of innovation; in other words, we will explore the poetry of the avant-gardes from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. We will begin with the work of expatriate American Ernest Fenollosa, especially his seminal essay, "The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry" (1919), and examine the depth of influence that sinology had on Ezra Pound in innovating Western poetics. This introduction to the rudiments of American modernist poetics is typical of the transnational approach this course will take in reading and analyzing avant-garde poetries, for the early twentieth century was a period in the arts and literature that put historically contiguous vanguard movements in conversation with one another in spite of nationalities and borders. By "American" poetry, we will mean "the long America"--the scope of our reading will cover avant-garde poetries from the U.S., some from Latin/South America (abstract movements such as "concrete poetry" that require no proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese, with criticism and theory all in English), and from Canada, contextualized by early twentieth-century avant-gardes of Europe. 

 

The discourse should include: the Anglo-American movements of Imagism and Vorticism; the iconoclasm of e. e. cummings; the Russian and Italian influences of Futurism; the Surrealist legacy of Andre Breton, the Dadaism of Tristan Tzara, and their influence on the New York School; the Objectivism of Charles Reznikoff, Louis Zukovsky, and Charles Olson; negritude, negrismo, and Harlem Renaissance poetry; Concrete Poetry as a global movement seeking to produce "a universal language"; Fluxus; Conceptualism and the found-text poetics of Kenny Goldsmith; contemporary ethnic avant-garde poets such as J. Michael Martinez and Rodrigo Toscano; and the Internet poetics of Flarf. The vast majority of poets, critics, and theorists on the reading list would be from the U.S., but we will explore how aesthetic innovation in emergent poetry was a transnational discourse across national boundaries and languages.

 

ENGL 70970 (will change to 70733) ::
Sem
inar in Rhetoric: Image Studies & Multimodal Rhetorics
Dr.
Joddy Murray
Wednesdays 5:00 - 7:40 p.m.

There is increasing attention being paid in many disciplines to the media used in discourse. The era of monomodal discourse continues to wane while technologies make it more immediately possible for rhetors to create products from a variety of textual modes—a multimodality that requires a flexible consideration of disciplinary boundaries and purposes. Ultimately, as we ask writers to compose, we are not only asking them to find the “best words in the best order,” but we are also asking them to compose image, sound, film bodies, selves, etc.

 

This seminar will ask students to both read and write multimodal texts. Assignments range from creating and maintaining a blog, designing a syllabus, and producing a short film.

In addition to handouts and/or a reader for this class, the following is an incomplete list of texts we may read (it will undoubtedly change, however):

  • Philosophy in a New Key by Susanne Langer (1957), ISBN: 0674665031
  • The Electronic Word: Democracy, Technology & the Arts by Richard Lanham (1995), ISBN: 0226468852
  • Talking, Sketching, Moving: Multiple Literacies in the Teaching of Writing by Patricia Dunn (2001), 0867095709
  • Multimodal Discourse: The Modes and Media of Contemporary Communication by Gunther Kress (2001), ISBN: 0340608773;
  • The Language of New Media by Lev Manovich (2002), ISBN: 0262632551;
  • Emobodied Literacies: Imageword and the Poetics of Teaching by Kristie Fleckenstein (2003), ISBN: 0809325268;
  • Writing New Media by Anne Francis Wysocki (2004), ISBN: 0874215757

ENGL 80123/WOST 60003 :: Introduction to Feminist Methodologies and Theories
Dr. Anne Frey
Tuesdays, 2:00 – 4:40 p.m.

This course provides graduate students from a variety of disciplines a thorough grounding in feminist theory and methodology. After briefly examining early feminist writing, we will read the foundational texts of American and European feminism in the 20th century, addressing issues such as biological determinism vs. social construction, women and the family, race and gender, Marxism and feminism, psychoanalysis and sexuality, and global feminism . We will also consider potential definitions and goals for contemporary, or “third-wave,” feminism. We will then examine how disciplines including literature, history, religion, geography, and cultural studies employ feminist theory in defining their goals and methodologies. Students will write a short (5-7) page presentation paper on assigned readings, and a longer paper on a topic of their own choosing.

ENGL 80413: Graduate Seminar on Shakespeare
Dr. Daniel Juan Gil
Mondays 6:00 - 8:40 p.m.

This course will have two interconnected aims:

  1. To familiarize students with the major theoretical traditions that have informed Shakespeare criticism over the past two decades.
  2. To help students articulate the philosophical and theoretical importance of Shakespeare’s plays in their historical context, and to develop original scholarly contributions to Shakespeare studies.

Major theoretical traditions that we will discuss include:

    • new historicism
    • feminism and gender studies
    • sexuality studies
    • textual and rhetorical criticism
    • history of science and humoral psychology
    • colonialism and post-colonialism
    • cultural sociology
    • biographical criticism
    • legal theory
    • Reformation studies

Each week we will read a major play along with representative criticism. In our discussions we will examine the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to Shakespeare Studies. We will work to identify under-researched or under-theorized areas in Shakespeare Studies and students will develop techniques for producing original, scholarly papers. Assigned work will include a “conference” style presentation and, if appropriate, applying to deliver a paper at a conference; two annotated bibliographies; two position papers; a final scholarly paper. Assigned readings may include the following plays by Shakespeare: As You Like It, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Othello, Titus Andronicus, King Lear. Assigned readings in scholarship may include work by Greenblatt, Sedgwick, Goldberg, Newman, Nietzsche, Loomba, Paster, Floyd-Wilson and Bourdieu.

 

ENGL 80513: Studies in American Literature since 1900—Modern Jewish Fiction
Dr. David Vanderwerken
Wednesdays 1:00 - 3:40 p.m.

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This class will study works by eight contemporary American writers whose religious heritage is Jewish.  American-Jewish novelists have been a dominant influence on American writing since World War II.  We will be engaged in trying to understand the distinctive nature of their contribution to recent American fiction and how their work has offered fresh perspectives on American experience.  The class will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Course requirements are a major paper, a presentation on a work that we will not study as a group, two survey/analyses of recent critical essays on two novels, a book review, and a comprehensive final examination.

 

TEXTS
Saul Bellow, Herzog (1964)
Rebecca Goldstein, Mazel (2001)
Cynthia Ozick, The Shawl (1983)
Chaim Potok, My Name is Asher Lev (1972)
Anne Roiphe, Lovingkindness (1987)
Isaac B. Singer, Enemies, A Love Story (1972)
Edward Lewis Wallant, The Pawnbroker (1961)
Elie Wiesel, Night (1958)

 

OTHER NOVELISTS FOR PRESENTATIONS

Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Pearl Abraham, Tovah Mirvis, Allegra Goodman, Norman Mailer, Alan Lelchuk, Michael Chabon, Marcie Hershman, Anita Diamant

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